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Team

 

  • Ghana node

    Dr Richmond Atta Ankomah is a Development Economist and a Research Fellow at the Institute of Statistical Social and Economic Research (ISSER), University of Ghana, Legon. He has extensive experience in quantitative research methods and analyses, particularly those based on large-scale survey, experimental and panel data designs. Richmond also has a good insight into qualitative research designs. Between 2017 and 2019, he was a visiting research fellow at the School of Social Sciences and Global Studies of the Open University, United Kingdom. His research interest converges around innovation and development, poverty and inequality, and industrial development issues. 


    Dr Monica Lambon-Quayefio is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Economics, University of Ghana, Legon. Her broad research interests are demographic and health economics with a particular focus on human capital development pertaining to maternal and child health, as well as education and labour market outcomes in developing country contexts. She has experience in analysing cross-sectional and longitudinal data, including large-scale national household surveys such as the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Surveys using both applied econometric and spatial econometric techniques. Her recent research projects have examined the relationship between child labour and intergenerational poverty, structural transformation and inequality and inclusive growth, as well as the inequality of opportunities and education outcomes. Her research has been published in development and health economics-related journals, including Oxford Development Studies and Applied Health and Health Policy.  


    Prof Abena D. Oduro is Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and the Director of the Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa at the University of Ghana, Legon. She is President-elect and Board Member of the International Association for Feminist Economics. She has published widely in development economics using survey data to analyse issues of assets, wealth, remittances and education using a gender lens. 

     

    UG profile


    Prof Robert Darko Osei is an Associate Professor in the Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER), University of Ghana, Legon, and also the Vice-Dean for the School of Graduate Studies at the same university. Robert is the Director for ACEIR’s Ghana node based at the University of Ghana, Legon. His main areas of research include evaluative poverty and rural research, macro and micro implications of fiscal policies, aid effectiveness and other economic development policy concerns. His research projects have been located in Ghana, Niger, Burkina Faso and Mali. He serves on several boards nationally and international and is a member of the President’s Fiscal Responsibility Advisory Council in Ghana. 


    Dr Nkechi S. Owoo is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Economics at the University of Ghana, Legon, where she currently teaches undergraduate and graduate course. She specialises in spatial econometrics and her research focuses on poverty, inequality and other micro-economic issues in developing countries, including household behaviour, health, gender, and population and demographic economics. Nkechi uses large household survey data in the spatial and empirical analysis of various socio-economic and development outcomes and is has published in internationally peer-reviewed journals such as Feminist Economics, Oxford Development Studies, and Journal of International Development.  

  • Kenya node

    Samuel Kipruto is a Senior Analyst/Advisor to the National Information Platform for Food and Nutrition project, an initiative of the European Commission supported by the United Kingdom Department for International Development and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Prior to the current appointment, he has been a senior Economist/Statistician at the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics with over 25 years’ experience working in the areas of survey designs, data collection, processing and analysis with a strong bias towards nutrition, poverty and inequality. He has wealth of experience in handling large datasets including censuses and large surveys. He holds a Master’s degree in Economic Policy Management from the University of Ghana, Legon and Bachelor of Science degree from Kenyatta University. For the Kenya node, he is  working on inequality trends and diagnostic in Kenya, as well as the impact of fiscal policy on inequality and poverty among other projects in Kenya. 


    Prof Damiano Manda is an Associate Professor at the School of Economics, University of Nairobi and manages the Thematic Research programme of the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC). He has previously worked at the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis as the Head of the Social Sector division. Damiano obtained his PhD in Economics at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and his field of expertise includes labour markets, poverty and inequality, and development economics. He has authored and co-authored several papers published in internationally refereed journals. 


    Prof Germano Mwabu is a Professor of Economics at the University of Nairobi, and also holds an appointment as an Adjunct Professor of Economics at Kenyatta University, where he previously has served as Dean of Commerce. Germano is a development economist with specialisations in health economics, labour economics, and quantitative analysis of poverty and social inequalities. His research experience includes short-term appointments at Cornell, Gothenburg, Brookings Institution and the World. He is a long-term resource person at the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) in Group A: Poverty, Income Distribution and Labour Markets. 


    Dr Moses Muriithi is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Economics, University of Nairobi, Kenya. He has a PhD degree in Health Economics from the University of Nairobi and his research areas span health economics, inequality and poverty, fiscal space estimations, national transfer accounts, social determinants of health, national strategy development in health, resource tracking and costings. Moses is also affiliated to the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) and the National Transfer Account (NTA) Social Determinant of Health Network (SDH-Net) research consortiums. He has collaborated with several government ministries in various countries and have published widely in refereed journals. 


    Dr Reuben Mutegi is a Lecturer of Educational Planning and Economics of Education at the School of Education, University of Nairobi, Kenya. He holds a Doctoral degree in Educational Planning and a Master’s degree in Educational Planning and Economics of Education from the University of Nairobi. His research areas relate to education and health policies, impact evaluation, M&E, labour dynamics, inequality, intergenerational accounting and demographic dividends. He is a team member of the National Transfer Account (NTA) and Counting Women Work (CWW) global research projects. Reuben previously worked at the United States International University-Africa. 


    Dr Martine Odhiambo Oleche is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Economics, University of Nairobi, Kenya. He has a PhD in Economics from the University of Nairobi with specialisation in health economics, development economics, economic policy analysis and planning, and industrial economics. Previously he worked for the Kenyan Ministry of Planning and National Development (now Devolution) as a Senior Economist in the state law office/attorney general’s office. Martine has undertaken numerous policy related consultancy work on development and health economics for the government, donor agencies and research institutions. He has diverse analytical skills in data processing, analyses, reporting, planning, and co-ordination as well as economic development policy analysis using time series, cross-sectional and panel data econometric models. 


    Paul Samoei is Head of Research and Development at the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics and is currently Acting Director of the Statistical Coordination and Methods Directorate in the Bureau. He is a PhD student at the University of Bern, Switzerland. He holds a Master’s degree in Statistics from the University of Nairobi and a degree in Statistics from Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology. His field of expertise include research, poverty and inequality. Paul has conducted research work on poverty and inequality with the World Bank. 


    Prof Anthony Wambugu is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Economics at the University of Nairobi, Kenya, where he teaches courses in microeconomic theory, labour economics, research methods and econometrics. He previously taught for nine years at Kenyatta University. He holds a Master in Economics from the University of Botswana and a PhD degree in Economics from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. His research focuses on labour market issues, human capital investment (education, on-the-job training, health and nutrition, migration) and poverty in developing countries. Anthony is intent on collaborations which strengthen networks for knowledge generation and application. 

  • South Africa node

    Dr Omolola Adeola is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow with the Southern Africa Labour and Develop-ment Research Unit at the School of Economics, University of Cape Town. She holds a PhD in Development Finance from Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and a Master’s degree from the University of Reading, United Kingdom. Her research interests include foreign capital flows, remittances, unemployment, poverty, and inequality. Her current research focuses on poverty and inequality issues in South Africa. 

     

    ResearchGate profile | Google Scholar profile


    Fabio Andrés Diaz Pabón is a Research Officer at the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit at the School of Economics, University of Cape Town. His research interests relate to conflict, development, and economics. His current research interest relates to understanding the mechanisms that bring about a political economy of inequality and conflict in developing countries. Fabio holds an MA in Development Studies from the Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and an MSc in Industrial Engineering from Colombia's Universidad de los Andes. He is also a Research Associate of the Department of Political and International Studies at Rhodes University, South Africa. 

    Google profile | Google Scholar profile


    Faaiqa Hartley joined the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit at the School of Econo-mics, University of Cape Town as Research Officer after four years at UCT’s Energy Research Centre and eight years at the National Treasury of South Africa. Her research has centred on developmental issues in Africa, primarily South Africa, and her recent interests include energy transitions, climate change and circular economics. She is proficient in economy-wide modelling techniques, particularly computable general equilibrium models and has been involved in the development of both the South African general equilibrium model, SAGE, and the South African linked energy-economic model, SATIMGE. She also collaborates with the United Nations University (UNU-WIDER) and the International Food Policy Research Institute. 


    Arindam Jana is a PhD student in the School of Economics at the University of Cape Town where he is studying urban spatial inequality, in particular the role of infrastructure provision and service delivery in perpetuating, or mitigating, spatial inequalities in cities of the Global South. He holds a MSc in Econo-mics from the Madras School of Economics, Anna University, India, and a BSc in Mathematics from the University of Madras, India. His other research interests are information design, cricket analytics, and development finance. 


    Muna Shifa is a senior research officer in the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit in the School of Economics, University of Cape Town. She holds an MCom and a PhD degree in Economics from the University of Cape Town and a BSc degree in Statistics from Addis Ababa University. Her research focuses on land tenure systems and rural livelihoods, urbanisation and development, social cohesion and inequality, and the analysis of poverty and inequality. She teaches postgraduate courses on complex surveys and measuring poverty and inequality at the School of Economics. 

    Google profile | ResearchGate profile


    Prof Murray Leibbrandt holds the National Research Foundation Chair in Poverty and Inequality Research in the School of Economics, University of Cape Town. He is the Director of the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit and of ACEIR. He serves on the Executive Committee of the International Economic Association and is a Senior Research Fellow of the United Nations University, UNU-WIDER. He has published widely in development economics using survey data, especially panel data to analyse South Africa’s poverty, inequality and labour market dynamics. 

    Google profile | RePEc profile


    Dr Rejoice Mabhena is a Postdoctoral student at the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit at the School of Economics, University of Cape Town. She has completed a PhD in Development Studies at the University of the Western Cape. Her research interests include poverty, inequality, food security and labour market issues in South Africa. Currently she is working on the use of cohort-based pseudo panels in the analysis of poverty in South Africa. 

     


    Penny Parenzee is enrolled for a PhD programme at the Nelson Mandela School of Public Governance, University of Cape Town, where she is one of the Programme Managers working with the School’s Executive Education unit. Her research is focused on examining the capacity to implement integrated policies that address inequality, and with a specific focus on South Africa’s National Integrated Early Childhood Development Policy. As a recipient of the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship, she completed two Master programmes at Bryn Mawr College in Phila-delphia, United States, over a two-year period: a Master’s in Law and Social Policy, and a Master’s in Clinical Social Work. She has been involved in monitoring the implementation of various laws and examined policy processes related to land, violence against women, and sexual and reproductive health and rights in South Africa, the Southern African Development Community, and East Africa. More recently, she has worked with the Institute of Security Studies, facilitating and conducting research on local level intersectoral interventions to prevent violence. 


    Prof Vimal Ranchhod is the Deputy Director of both the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, School of Economics at the University of Cape Town, and of ACEIR. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Michigan, United States. His research interests include labour economics, economic demography, the economics of inequality, and the economics of education. 

     

     

    Google profile | RePEc Profile


    Rocco Zizzamia is a DPhil candidate at the Oxford Department of International Development and also works as Research Officer at the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, School of Economics at the University of Cape Town. He holds an MPhil in Development Studies from the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, and a BA Hons in Economic History from the University of Cape Town, South Africa. His previous experience includes consulting work for the World Bank and a visiting appointment at the German Institute for Global and Area Studies in Hamburg, Germany. His research interests are regionally focused on South African poverty, inequality and labour markets. 

    ODID profile | Google Scholar profile

  • Data hub

    Prof Martin Wittenberg is a Professor in the School of Economics at the University of Cape Town. He teaches econometrics at the post-graduate level and is also the director of DataFirst, a unit specialising in the dissemination and preservation of data from African socioeconomic surveys. Martin spent a decade teaching at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and a year as visiting Professor at Princeton, as well as a year's sabbatical at Yale. His main research is in the area of data quality of household surveys, and the analysis of inequality and labour markets in South Africa. 

    Google profile | Scholar profile


    Dr Takwanisa Machemedze is ACEIR’s Data Officer and a Researcher at DataFirst, a data service and research unit at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He holds a PhD in Sociology and an MPhil in Demography, both obtained from the University of Cape Town, and a BSc Hon in Statistics from the University of Zimbabwe. His research interests include demography, public health and spatial statistics.

     

     


    Lynn Woolfrey is a Data Scientist with more than 20 years’ experience curating and sharing disaggregated African data. She manages data operations at DataFirst, a data service and research unit at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. She is responsible for DataFirst’s open data repository, which is the only CoreTrustSeal certified repository in Africa. In 2012 she set up this data centre to give researchers controlled access to sensitive or highly disaggregated government data. She trains data managers in government and research institutions across Africa and have participated in United Nations projects to assist governments to assess their data readiness for Sustainable Development Goal planning and monitoring. Lynn’s research interest is open government data and information ecosystems for data-directed decision-making in African countries. 

  • Administration and communication

    Haajirah Esau has worked with the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit of the University of Cape Town as a Project Manager since 2012, working on three large projects; the REDI3x3 project, the Mandela Initiative, and one of the university’s strategic initiatives, the Poverty & Inequality Initiative. Preceding 2012, she held the portfolio of Cluster Manager: Strategic Support, in UCT’s Research Office. Haajirah joined UCT in 2005, following seven years at the District Six Museum, where she worked in various capacities. Her experience includes project management, fundraising, and communications and knowledge management. 


    Prof Murray Leibbrandt holds the National Research Foundation Chair in Poverty and Inequality Research in the School of Economics at the University of Cape Town. He is the Director of UCT's Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit as well as of the African Centre of Excellence for Inequality Research within the African Research Universities Alliance. He is on the Executive Committee of the International Economic Association, co-chairs the Scientific Panel on Population, Poverty and Inequality of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, and is a Senior Research Fellow of the United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research. He has published widely in development economics using survey data and especially panel data to analyse South Africa’s poverty, inequality and labour market dynamics. In 1995–96 he served on President Nelson Mandela’s Labour Market Commission to advise on post-apartheid labour market legislation and, from 2016–17, served on then Deputy-President Cyril Ramaphosa’s Advisory Panel on the National Minimum Wage. From 2007–2019 he was a Principal Investigator on the National Income Dynamics Study, South Africa’s national longitudinal study. 

    Google profile | RePEc profile


    Charmaine Smith is a writer, editor and communication specialist who’s worked in the academic and civil society sectors for the past 20 years, often in partnership with high-profile government departments and development agencies. She previously served as the communication and knowledge manager of the Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town, where she played a central role in the development and implementation of a communication strategy that has raised the visibility and reputation of the Institute as a cutting-edge policy research and advocacy unit. Since then, she has worked as the part-time communication manager for several SALDRU-led projects: the Mandela Initiative, UCT’s Poverty & Inequality Initiative and currently for the African Centre of Excellence for Inequality Research and the Basic Package of Support project. Charmaine has a MA Journalism degree (cum laude) from Stellenbosch University; a post-graduate diploma in writing and producing for the media from Hertsford College, England; and a national diploma in journalism from Pretoria Technicon. 

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